Limited Re-establishment

Some boots are better staying off dead

One of the more popular things that brands have done in the past few years is for brands to remake or re-release a popular boot of theirs. Adidas has been one of the best brands when it comes to this, with the Three Stripes releasing the boots with the original style of the uppers dropped onto modern soleplates, where as Nike has mostly stuck to colour updates that are “inspired” by these older models. Mizuno and Puma has both previously done remakes that that not only have the original uppers but also the original soleplates as well. However, as this blog has mentioned previously, its not always a good thing to have to have so many re-releases. And sometimes, some boots are better off staying in the past.

A great example of one such boot is last year’s adidas F506+ which was a remake that no-one was asking for and ended up frustrating fans who wanted the original F50 from 2004 to be remade instead, yours truly among them. Instead of giving people a nostalgic look back at the boots, the F506+ only showed how poor the upper of the first F50 TiNIT were while also demonstrating how off base the originals were.

This is where Nike does deserve credit because certain boots, like the original Superfly, would be a great remake for collectors but the actual performance would suffer compared to even a regular Vapor to the point that a remake would be a bad move on Nike’s part. Having that original colourway release as part of the DNA Pack meant that people could get those retro vibes while still getting the performance of a modern boot.

While the Big Three have had a lot of hits over the years, even some of those previously popular boots should probably stay in the past rather than being given a remake. A lot of people are pleading for Nike to bring back the original Maestri and it’s one of the hottest boots on the resale market but the innovation Nike made in that series alone, without even including everything that has come after, shows that Nike might be playing it smart by not re-releasing a boot with the original Maestri upper. Though this blog will admit that there has been nothing like the Maestri series since it was discontinued.

Other boots that were much beloved in the past also probably don’t need the re-release treatment. The Predator Pulse was a very popular boot at the time but looking back it has been greatly overshadowed by the Predator Absolute and especially the Predator Mania. Adidas has been smart by not re-releasing the Pulse as its name doesn’t carry the same weight as other Predator models.

Still want these. Photo Credit: ProDirectSoccer

The most sought-after series of boots, along with the adidas Predator, is the Mercurial series. Like the Predator, you could pick almost any model of the boots and you will have your share of die-hards, unlike the Predator, which has been mostly Kangaroo leather through its lifespan and this is easier to break in, some of the earlier Mercurials have not aged as well. There is no doubt that a lot of them still look brilliant, but the earlier uppers leave a lot to be desired and it is in Nike’s best interest to release colours “inspired by” the earlier models rather than direct remakes. This is said as someone who absolutely loves the Mercurial Vapor III and the 10th Anniversary Mercurial boots being one of my Unicorn boots. Despite my love for them, if you were to tell me I had to pick between the current Vapor 13 and the Vapor 3 to wear for a season, I know the Vapor 13 would be the best choice every time.

This is just a little suggestion about how brands should approach their remakes. Not everything needs a remake and sometimes that time and money can be better spent by producing something new instead bringing back the past.

What do you think about brands releasing remakes of original boots? Please share this with your friends and make sure to follow me on Instagram, Facebook and Twitter!

じゃあね!

aglockhart

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